Letters to the editor

Editor:

Has Supervisor Eric Mar lost his mind, or has he merely fallen into the stagnancy of the other "stupidvisors" that run our once remarkable city?

I was totally amazed reading his column regarding the creation of a farmers' market in the parking lot behind Walgreens, on Ninth Avenue. We currently have seven or eight vegetable-selling outlets on Clement Street, between Fourth and Ninth avenues, not to mention the produce market at Fourth Avenue and Geary Boulevard.

Has Mr. Mar ever driven Clement Street attempting to find a parking place, while running the gauntlet of double parked cars? Parking is at a premium on Clement Street at present, and he claims the loss of a parking lot for a farmers' market would be a great thing?

Has he given any thought to the votes he will stand to lose if he pursues this unnecessary, unwanted venture, from the people who shop at the large vegetable vendors on Clement Street at present, plus their owners and employees?

Having been a Richmond District resident since 1984, Mr. Mar, we do not need another vegetable vendor, particularly one that will create additional adverse driving and parking conditions.

Raoul Epling

Editor:

The enclosed photo is of the formerly beautiful Elk Glen Lake, just off Martin Luther King Jr. Drive near 25th Avenue, in Golden Gate Park. This reeking mess is the present condition of the entire north end of the lake. If you look closely, you'll notice that the growth of vile smelling pond junk is packed tight so that it supports various pieces of trash and garbage, making it seem more like a dump than a lake.

For many years, the trails of the park have provided me refuge from the hustle and hassle of the City. Elk Glen is just one of the many lakes whose peace, quiet and beauty have given me a feeling of nature in the heart of San Francisco. That was before.

Now, Elk Glen and other lakes are symptoms of neglect - choked with weeds that jeopardize the health of the water and wildlife. The trails that surround the lakes and wander through the woods and gardens have become weed and trash infested, and one of their most prominent features is broken glass.

I don't think we can simply blame this on the folks who use the park as a home. During events, such as the recently completed bluegrass festival, thousands of people tramp everywhere with little or no consideration. The mounds of trash left behind are like something out of science fiction - "WALL-E" perhaps.

I've been privileged to explore other urban parks, and it seems because people consider it their civic duty, they've become beautiful symbols of the health of the cities. Central Park in New York, Fairmount Park in Philadelphia and virtually any park in London all get plenty of use and all look and feel like safe and clean playgrounds that receive adequate care and consideration. What does Golden Gate Park say about us and do we care to change it?

The place is a dump, and has the feel that we've given up. Unless we are willing to reconsider our attitude, it can only get worse.

George I. Lister

Editor:

Your front page rant against the public workers in this City is typical of the small business mentality that reigns across the country. What the proper headline on an article concerning this attack should read is: "Stop supporting the dinosaurs," referring to the downtown banks, Montgomery Street stock manipulators, hedge fund managers, insurance company executives and other business interests concerned about paying any more taxes. Obviously, your doing your job as a supporter of those interests.

What would really frost your pumpkin is if Proposition B were passed and the workers took their just anger to the streets with strike action and tied this City up in knots.

Charles M. Minster

Hands of Public Workers Unions

Editor:

The article you wrote in the Richmond Review was terrific! You hit the nail on the head, your commentary on "stop feeding the gorilla" puts the blame where it should be. You have my vote on Proposition B and no vote on Proposition 25.

Thanks for saying it for all of us, now if they will just listen!

It is always fun to get the Richmond Review. You are doing a wonderful job and a service to our community.

Gayle Chan